BIG STATE RENOVATIONS & CONSTRUCTION

kitchen, real estate, interior design

Is your home ready for the “New Normal”

In the months since the COVID19 pandemic took hold of the U.S., our homes have become much more than just living spaces. Dining rooms have become offices. Living rooms are gyms, and the kitchen counter is our classroom. After months of sheltering in place, we’ve redefined what home features are most important in our new normal. COVID-19 is changing what homeowners care most about, and it may have a lasting impact on future home design trends. Here are some of the most notable renovations that homeowners are looking to make:

Home Office Space

COVID19 lockdowns turned kitchen and dining room tables into workstations and classrooms. Working parents and school-age children vied for space, bandwidth, and privacy as they juggled various work and school assignments. Even after the danger of the pandemic passes, many companies will continue to allow employees to work from home at least part of the time. It is also likely that schools will retain some online components, which will increase the demand for multiple functional office spaces: one for each working adult and school-aged child. Each workspace must have powerful internet, plenty of plugs and docking space for electronics, an uncluttered work surface, and shelves or drawers for storage. Suppose space doesn’t allow for a dedicated home office? In that case, underused areas such as guest rooms, hallways, utility rooms, and landings can be retrofitted to include functional and stylish office features like built-in bookshelves and desks.

Zoom Rooms / Quiet Spaces

It’s surprising how quickly videoconferencing became the norm for work, school, and personal communication. Overnight, everyone began collaborating, communicating, and socializing via Zoom, Teams, or other platforms. Right on the heels of this trend came the list of tips for a successful video meeting. The optimum lighting, surroundings, background, and sound quality have become deciding factors in how and where we meet online. The open-concept home may not offer the ideal space for video conferencing. As people continue working and studying from home, they will want rooms or special areas to be optimized for Zoom chats and video calls.

Recreational Space / Sanctuary Space

When gyms closed their doors to stop the spread of infection, many people bought home fitness equipment like stationary bikes, treadmills, or exercise systems. Digital classes and sessions with online trainers have become increasingly interactive and popular. Even when gyms reopen, many people may decide to work out in the privacy of their own homes. In addition to exercise, many of us realize the need to decompress and destress. According to the American Psychiatric Association, more than a third of Americans said the coronavirus has impacted their mental health. Homeowners may want to create sanctuary-like spaces such as reading corners, meditation spaces, or green areas in or around their homes.

Ample Storage

At the beginning of the pandemic, anxious Americans raced to their grocery stores and inexplicably hoarded toilet paper. Soon after, they began hoarding non-perishables, cleaning supplies, flour, and meat. Homeowners now want extra storage space for food, staples, and other household supplies. Larger pantries, kitchen islands with storage, and supply rooms will become important features even after the pandemic passes.

 

Speak to a renovation specialist to learn how we can help bring your dream home to reality. Contact us now for more information.

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